Dr. THEODORE receives prestigious award for his contribution to education aid and charity program in Kenya

Dr. THEODORE Theodoropoulos and His Excellency FATUMA Hirsi Mohamed, Minister of Hospitality and Tourism in Kenya hold discussions in the capital, Nairobi, regarding the potentials for a productive future investments across the country. Dr. Theodore received prestigious award for his contribution to education aid and charity program in Kenya, including his financial contribution to Kabete Orphans Chirdren’s and his charity program in Kenya with AHLEN FOUNDATION (http://www.ahlenfoundation.org/message-kenya.htm).  Dr. Theodore at his visit in the Ministry of Education said that ”in Ahlen Foundation, we equip and empower children and young people for a brighter future through provision, protection and preparation, ensuring that they have the opportunity to fulfil their potential and make a difference in their families and communities”. Additionally, he said that ”today’s world faces global challenges, which require global solutions. These interconnected global challenges call for far-reaching changes in how we think and act for the dignity of fellow human beings. It is not enough for education to produce individuals who can read, write and count. Education must be transformative and bring shared values to life. It must cultivate an active care for the world and for those with whom we share it. Education must fully assume its central role in helping people to forge more just, peaceful, tolerant and inclusive societies”.

Dr. Theodore received prestigious award for his contribution to education aid and charity in Kenya, including his financial contribution to Kabete Orphans Chirdren’s and his charity program in Kenya with AHLEN FOUNDATION (http://www.ahlenfoundation.org/message-kenya.htm), Photo: QGN

 

Ms. FAITH Mora, the AHLEN FOUNDATION Charity Ambassador for Kenya, said that ”today was another God-inspired day in Kenya, as this afternoon and tonight we had the privilege to share with the beautiful, lovely children in a party at The Salvation Army Kabete Children’s Home in Nairobi. The home provides a place of safety for children, many of whom are orphans. Kabete caters for 65 children aged 3 to 18 years.  Remember, the best place for the child is with his or her family, so if not …what’s next? Let’s work together to Give a Child a Future”.

Dr. Theodore Theodoropoulos, CEO of POWERGLOBE QATAR, met Her Excellency Dr. Amina Mohammed, Minister of Foreign Affairs and the Minister of Energy and Petroleum His Excellency Charles Keter, as well in order to proceed Gas to Power and eleciricity projects in Kenya. Notice, that only 40% of the Kenyan population has today access to electricity. Kenya shows all the potentials to become both a transit tourism services point for East Africa, as it is one of the most geographically diverse countries on earth with vast expanses of Savannah, highland ranges, equatorial rain forest, extinct volcanoes, a series of fresh water and soda lakes, alpine glaciers, arid deserts and tropical beaches, and an energy (natural gas, liquefied natural gas and electricity) transit hub for the whole region.

Ahlen Foundation contributes to Global Education Aid

The world faces global challenges, which require global solutions. These interconnected global challenges call for far-reaching changes in how we think and act for the dignity of fellow human beings. It is not enough for education to produce individuals who can read, write and count. Education must be transformative and bring shared values to life. It must cultivate an active care for the world and for those with whom we share it. AHLEN FOUNDATION: http://www.ahlenfoundation.org/education1.html

Education must also be relevant in answering the big questions of the day. Technological solutions, political regulation or financial instruments alone cannot achieve sustainable development. It requires transforming the way people think and act. Education must fully assume its central role in helping people to forge more just, peaceful, tolerant and inclusive societies. It must give people the understanding, skills and values they need to cooperate in resolving the interconnected challenges of the 21st century.

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©AhlenFoundation2016-21/2/2016/Pirozzi, Young girls at Nwambwa school in Bugiri, Uganda, promote education for girls

Barriers to global citizenship Legacy of the current education system. Schools have traditionally prepared people to pass exams, proceed to the next level and graduate into the workplace. We now face the much greater challenge of raising global citizens. Promoting respect and responsibility across cultures, countries and regions has not been at the centre of education. Global citizenship is just taking root and changing traditional ways of doing things always brings about resistance. This entails changing the way education is organized – making content more relevant to contemporary life and global challenges, introducing innovative and participatory teaching and learning styles. We must rethink the purpose of education and prepare students for life, not exams alone. AHLEN FOUNDATION: http://www.ahlenfoundation.org/education3.html

Outmoded curricula and learning materials. Reviews from around the world find that today’s curricula and textbooks often reinforce stereotypes, exacerbate social divisions, and foster fear and resentment of other groups or nationalities. Rarely are curricula developed through a participatory process that embraces excluded and marginalized groups. But change is possible when educators adopt a vision of ethical global citizenship. Lessons from India and Ghana, for example, show that explicitly teaching good citizenship as a subject can have powerful results with more empowered and ethical students emerging. Deeply entrenched beliefs take time to change. But young people are open to new perspectives, and schools are ideally positioned to convey them.

Hawa-Luul Ali Hussein (age 13) Photographer: Mohamed Abdulle Farayare
A 13y young girl in Somalia. ‘’’Every girl has a dream to graduate from a university and help her family’’’ These are Amal’s (photo) own words. But against this backdrop, achieving such an ambition might have seemed an impossibly uphill battle – until recently

Lack of teacher capacity. Broad teacher development reforms are needed to ensure the uptake of new citizenship skills. If we want to transform the way students learn, we must also help teachers expand their own skills and outlooks. Are they comfortable with a curriculum that dwells explicitly on global citizenship? Can they teach traditional subjects in ways that exemplify non-discrimination and positive support to the disadvantaged? Many teachers lack the training, confidence and classroom resources to meet these challenges without support and instruction. We owe it to them, and our children, to provide it.

Teachers must both be comfortable with the content of what they are teaching but also model it in their teaching practice. This means on-going teacher development and participatory learning techniques are important to ensure teachers feel comfortable teaching about global citizenship explicitly. Teachers can help build ideas and habits of non-discrimination and positive support to the disadvantaged through the way they conduct their teaching of literacy, numeracy and other subjects.

Inadequate focus on values. The values of peace, human rights, respect, cultural diversity and justice are often not embodied in the ethos of schools. Instead of empowering students to learn and thrive, schools often replicate social inequalities and reinforce social pathologies by tolerating bullying and gender-based violence and subjecting children to physical and psychological punishment. Young people learn much from schools, but what they learn is not only in their lessons. Teachers and administrators must learn to model the skills we want students to develop, such as good environmental practices, participatory decision-making, and the control and prevention of violence through reporting policies and clear codes of conduct.

Lack of leadership on Global Citizenship. To create a generation that values the common good, we must understand how young people see the world today – and our schools must find ways to foster a broader vision. Goals and targets should be set around 21st century skills and regularly assessed to measure progress. Open discussion of tolerance and human rights can be politically sensitive, but it is critical if we want to overcome divisions and expand the prospects for peace and prosperity. Success will require support from a wide range of stakeholders, including the highest levels of government.

Ahlen Foundation in humanitarian and development aid across South Eastern Europe

In addition to Africa, Ahlen Foundation (http://www.ahlenfoundation.org/news-diary.html) can and must play a bigger role globally in cutting-edge humanitarian and development aid. It would be able to play a role in trying to assist the desperate refugees that find themselves in Greece and SE Europe.

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Picture of Syrian Refugees in Athens

The demand from crisis regions expected to grow considerably. Syria’s bloodletting shows no sign of easing. There are fears of a fresh influx of refugees crossing the Mediterranean to flee intensified violence in Libya. Renewed fighting in Ukraine could trigger a westward exodus. If that happens, Greece first and then the rest of Europe could face a crisis closer to the scale faced by those who are really on the front line of Syria’s refugee tragedy. Jordan has taken in 630,000 Syrian refugees. Little Lebanon houses 1.2 million and Turkey is home to 1.8 million, according to the UNHCR. Those figures give some context to the 260,500 Syrians who have applied for asylum in all 28 EU nations since the war began in 2011. The partnership for financial support will help these families and their kids to live with dignity and hope for a better future. I can personally guarantee that your help will reach to refugees whenever is needed, with full of transparency, accountability and professionalism, applying the high principles of charity for humanitarian and development aid.

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The congregation of third country nationals comes after migrant smugglers continued to ferry over people from the opposite Turkish coast, although the flow slowed this week due to rough seas in the area. Moreover, 1,300 people remained camped out at the port of Piraeus’ passenger terminals, on the mainland, after arriving by ferry boat from the Greek isles.   Refugees, mostly Syrians and Iraqis, as well as irregular migrants from as far away as Morocco and Bangladesh, have flooded Greece over the past year in a bid to reach preferred destinations in central and northern Europe. Practically all of the refugees and migrants were trafficked or departed Turkey before landing on EU territory.

Sources: AhlenFoundation, Reuters, BBC, CNN News, Greek National News, Era TV, GNN, MTV News, Gulf-times, Qatar Agency News, GRN, Kenyan News, Nairobi News, NNG Kenyan News.